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Office of Film & Literature Classification

We worked with youth health expert Dame Sue Bagshaw on a quick and easy overview on how our brains grow.

We have tools and advice for parents and whānau to help their rangatahi deal with challenging content.

New research shows New Zealanders are worried about the growing spread of misinformation and the harm it is causing our communities.

Frequently asked questions and advice for parents who want to talk with their young people about pornography.

Latest news and blog posts

Blog Post - Misinformation is hurting Aotearoa

09 July 2021

Blog post - We’re on the Edge of the Infodemic

02 July 2021

News - Misinformation in Aotearoa

30 June 2021

Blog post - Come over to the…shark side

18 June 2021

Blog Post - Nudes and Youth

15 June 2021

News - Think before you nude

14 June 2021

Blog post - What I learnt at Censor for a Day

08 June 2021

Blog post - The book you wish you had as a teen

31 May 2021

What do the ratings/classifications mean?

What do the ratings/classifications mean?

All about rating/classification labels and descriptive notes.

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Ratings

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OFLC updates

Including updates on the latest research carried out by the Office of Film & Literature Classification, media releases and other breaking news.

The Edge of the Infodemic - Challenging Misinformation in Aotearoa

30 June 2021

Read our latest research report, The Edge of the Infodemic - Challenging Misinformation in Aotearoa Read More

Youth Advisory Panel: 2020 Report

31 March 2021

Read our latest Youth Advisory Panel report and see what the panel got up to in 2020. Read more

Growing up with Porn: Insights from young New Zealanders

18 April 2020

Read our latest research report, Growing up with Porn - Insights from young New Zealanders Read more

Recent classification decisions

These are brief snapshots of recent classification decisions. For more detailed information on selected titles see featured classification decisions

09/07/2021 - R16: Sex scenes, sexual content, drug use and offensive language Read more about Dating Amber

What's it about?  Set in a small town in 1995 Ireland, Dating Amber is a romantic comedy-drama that follows high school seniors Eddie and Amber. Eddie is a closeted gay man, still in denial and pressured by his army dad’s expectations and his parents’ rocky marriage. Amber is a closeted lesbian secretly saving to move to the big city and work for a zine. Both get teased at school for not behaving as typical teenagers. To put a stop to the gossip, Amber and Eddie decide to date each other. This works for a time, until Amber meets Sarah and wants to take things to the next level.

What to expect? Dating Amber is a heart-warming comedy-drama about self- acceptance. The film regularly deals with teenage sex, particularly the characters’ experimentation as they navigate their sexuality amidst a homophobic community. There is regular use of highly offensive language, as well as some homophobic slurs. The impact of this intolerance is somewhat limited by regular doses of humour, warm moments between Eddie, Amber and their families, and their ultimate acceptance of who they are. Although the sexual content is inexplicit and light-hearted, this and the cruelty of homophobia require a mature perspective to understand. While of low-level, the violence is likely to have some impact on children due to the young age of the characters. Additionally there is one scene where illicit drug use is presented as fun, which may be misinterpreted as promotional by younger viewers. For these reasons, Dating Amber is restricted to people aged 16 and over.

24/06/2021 - R16: Violence, sexual references and offensive language Read more about The Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard

What's it about? The Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard is big-budget action comedy starring three well-known Hollywood actors. Having lost his bodyguard licence, Michael Bryce decides to take a sabbatical in order to deal with his trauma. Almost immediately, he is thrown back into bodyguard life when hitman Darius Kinkaid’s wife, Sonia, asks him to help her free her husband. They get enlisted to thwart a cyber attack.

What to expect? The film is full of ridiculously over-the-top action sequences intercut with humorous banter. It is likely to have wide appeal, but given the extensive violence, and widespread use of highly offensive language it requires a restriction. There are sexual references, an obscured but comical sex scene, and minor drug references, which are also unsuitable for younger audiences.The humorous tone with the bloody gun violence has a trivialising effect. This is likely to desensitize or inure younger viewers to violence by presenting it as entertaining, exciting, and consequence-free. For these reasons, The Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard is restricted to people aged 16 years and over.

17/06/2021 - M: Domestic violence and offensive language Read more about Herself

What's it about? Herself is an Irish drama film about Sandra, mother to two girls who has recently left her violent husband Gary. She juggles two jobs as well as parenting and dealing with the state housing system. She embarks on building a tiny house with the help of friends and family. Gary gets in the way.

What to expect? Herself is an empathetic drama chronicling a woman’s fight to gain stability for her family while dealing with government bureaucracy and an abusive ex. The film has social merit as it highlights the plight of domestic violence victims and their struggle to rebuild their lives. Viewers of any age are likely to find the domestic violence confronting, or even triggering. However, the depictions are brief and reasonably restrained, limiting their impact. The focus on Sandra’s personal growth encourages viewers to sympathise with her predicament, and may prompt conversations about how to more effectively help similarly placed individuals. This subject matter, and the occasional offensive language are unlikely to harm younger viewers but make the film more suitable for mature viewers. Herself is therefore classified as M, an unrestricted classification recommended for mature viewers.

10/06/2021 - R16: Violence, offensive language, and content that may disturb Read more about Deliver Us From Evil

What's is about? Deliver Us From Evil is an action-thriller from South Korea. Former secret agent In-Nam now earns a living as a hitman. Set to retire after killing big shot crime boss Koreda, he receives news that his ex-girlfriend Young Joo has been murdered and her daughter Yoo-min, kidnapped. In-Nam frantically searches for Yoo-min before child traffickers sell her. To complicate matters, deranged killer Ray makes it his mission to avenge his brother Koreda’s death by targetting In-Nam, starting with his family and close associates.

What to expect? Deliver Us from Evil is a gritty action-drama with an engaging plot. It contains close range fight scenes that involve a degree of brutality and callousness likely to shock and disturb younger viewers. Cruelty, although only indirectly implied, is also likely to disturb this audience. The regular depictions of violence and crime may have a normalising and desensitising effect on impressionable young viewers. The film contains regular use of highly offensive language, further supporting the need for a restriction. Older teenagers and adults will be able to contextualise the content as a high-octane but largely implausible action feature.

03/06/2021 - M: Violence, offensive language and content that may disturb Read more about Minamata

What's it about? Minamata is a drama film based on real-life events. Set in 1971, the film follows tortured war photojournalist Eugene (Gene) Smith who goes on a mission to document the devastating effects of mercury poisoning on a coastal Japanese community. Upon arrival in Japan, Gene is met with hostility from the owners of Chisso, the industrial plant responsible for polluting the wastewater with toxins. With the support of local activists and Aileen, a Japanese translator, Gene begins to unmask the devastating effects of corporate greed.

What to expect? The film deals with the horrors of war and the harm to victims of toxic poisoning. Suffering from PTSD, some of Gene's nightmares show haunting imagery of dead bodies in muddy trenches. There are brief images of the effects of mercury poisoning including dead and/or deformed bodies (such as twisted limbs and hands), a father carrying a dead child, and cats and people convulsing. Some scenes of violence may also startle younger viewers. While this content is not strong enough to warrant a restriction, it is more suitable for mature audiences.

27/05/2021 - M: Violence Read more about No Man's Land

What's it about? No Man’s Land is an action adventure film. Border vigilante Bill Greer and his sons Jackson and Lukas are on patrol when Jackson accidentally kills a young Mexican immigrant. Bill tries to take the blame but Texas Ranger, Ramirez, sees through the lie, spurring Jackson to flee across the Rio Grande border on horseback. Jackson journeys across deserts and mountains to seek forgiveness from the dead boy's vengeful father, Gustavo. 

What to expect? No Man’s Land provides a humanising perspective on the lives of families who are caught up in the tension between USA and Mexico. It is intended for older audiences who have some understanding of the political and social issues involved. Crime isn’t dealt with in a way that creates any moral ambiguity for younger viewers. The film focuses on the negative consequences of vigilantism and the life changing outcomes for the central protagonists. The film’s few depictions of violence are brief and inexplicit. The more confronting imagery may be briefly startling to younger viewers but is unlikely to cause them lasting harm such as nightmares, nor is it likely to make them fearful of real life situations. However this content makes the film more suitable for older viewers. Considering these factors, No Man’s Land is classified as unrestricted but with a recommendation that it is more suited to mature audiences.

Minds Over Media

Video transcripts

  • What do they want to know?

    Video transcript - What do they want to know?

    The video clip is a minute long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: What do they want to know? appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    I think it's - again, it's about listening. So it's really important to listen to what actually do they want to know? Because us with our adult minds (dirty, filthy minds that we've got) we go straight to, "Oh, they must be asking about the details of intercourse, or the - they want to know about oral sex, or..." But actually they really don't want that much detail. They just want to know that you're happy to answer. So always - if they ask you a question, you go (gasp) 'Oh, how am I going to answer this?' Just ask them back. "Why do you want to know? What would you like to know about that?" And then clarify, and you might find they don't want to know all that much detail and you go way over the top and totally unnecessarily. So those, "I'm wondering how come you think like that? I'm wondering why you ask that question? I'm just wanting to understand where you're coming from." Rather than listening to think, "Oh help, how am I going to answer that one?"

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Really listen

    Video transcript - Really listen

    The video clip is one minute and two seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Really listen appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    I mean, for me the biggest message I want to get across to parents is "listen". The biggest feedback I get from kids is "My parents don't listen to me". And parents think they're listening, but kids don't feel heard. And I think it's that difference between listening, but you're still doing something and actually listening and reflecting and actually spending time to not necessarily looking people in the eye, because that’s really embarrassing, but while you’re driving or while you’re doing something automatic so that you’re doing it alongside each other, but really hearing. So I think trying to listen to what the underlying message is what the child is trying to say because they haven’t got the vocabulary. So we really need to listen to the emotion and the need underneath. And that kind of listening, whoa. If we could all do that, our society would be way different. Especially our politicians.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Thinking critically

    Video transcript - Thinking critically

    The video clip is 42 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Thinking critically appears on screen.

    I think we kind of need to apply and teach people critical thinking powers to actually see what the underlying assumptions are; actually evaluate them in terms of your own experience and then draw some conclusions about what you're watching, rather than just jumping to conclusions. So I think it's really important that we teach young people right now as they're growing up, even from childhood on, that entertainment is entertainment - it's not reality. Yes we make movies of reality, but at the same time we're doing that for a purpose sometimes to help us reflect and think about ourselves so that we can actually say, "Well are we ok with this?"

    This is intercut with footage from Black Mirror of a young man watching a sexualised music video.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Getting started is easy

    Video transcript - Getting started is easy

    The video clip is 28 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Getting started is easy appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    Watching a movie together is really good, because then you can go, "So what did you think about when that guy kissed her? What do you think about when that guy pushed her over because she wouldn't kiss him? What did you-" and kind of start at that level and kind of have those conversations around something you're watching. It's not the big talk but you pick up on that opportunity of watching something which you know is probably going to touch on those subjects and then you can talk about it.

    This is intercut with footage from 13 Reasons Why of a young woman sliding down a slide and kissing a young man.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • A handy guide to brain development

    Video transcript - A handy guide to brain development

    The video clip is 2 minutes and 15 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: A hnady guide to brain development appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    I'm so glad you asked because now I can do my handy model of brain development! So brains develop from the bottom up. So this bit here is your spinal cord going down the back of your neck. The base of the thumb is the base of your brain and that controls all your organs without you having to think - the automatic nervous system, I call it - and your noradrenaline-adrenaline production; the bit that reacts to fear - that gets you going basically. That's all linked in online when you're born but not much else.

    So all the structures are there but they're not online. The first five years of life you can actually see it through your eyes, because you can see them learn to walk, talk, and chew gum at the same time, and then this bit in the middle - the thumb - is your limbic system. And that's the bit which deals with emotion and new ways of laying down memory. The amygdala's there and the amygdala's really important because that's the bit that looks for danger and it's really on hyper alert with young people and it's firing up like mad, really coming online so their amygdala is much bigger than an adult's. So they're hyper alert already. If they've had bad experiences growing up, that's hyper alerted them as well - their already developed amygdalas.

    But this bit, which is the bit - the cortex - that brings in your thinking about thinking and your ability to think is only online about 20% of the time for teenagers. So they think with their emotions and that's what you have to be aware of when they're exposed to all this media stuff. Adults have that thinking to critically review it and say, "This isn't real, this is rubbish; this doesn't equate with anything I know" but teenagers haven't got that. So adults need to be the frontal cortex for their teenagers, to be able to help them calm down their amygdalas, which go zooming off with horror stuff. We all like a bit of a noradrenaline buzz, that's why horror movies do so well, but at the same time not overly much.

    Because some young people will have that horror buzz for two years after they've seen something and that's going to affect how they function in their lives. So really important that parents are there to help filter and to help do that critical thinking.

    This is intercut with footage from Black Mirror of a child being taken care of by her caregivers, and seeing other students in a playground watching media.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Concrete vs abstract thinkers

    Video transcript - Concrete vs abstract thinkers

    The video clip is one minute and seven seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Concrete vs. Abstract Thinkers appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    The other thing that I think we have to remember is the nature of a concrete thinker. So a concrete thinker will take everything literally and will just translate what they've seen into real life, whereas an abstract thinker will go, "Oh yeah, but that's not real life - that's fine, I can keep my stuff separate. That's just entertainment, that's okay." But it's a really blurred line for a lot of things, especially if you've had adverse experiences growing up, so you blur that line. It's really hard to know what's real and what's not and that's I think the danger of the violence that we see and the sexual violence that we see is: where's that blurred line, and how do we determine where that line comes when it's so difficult to determine what's real and what's not real? And certainly for young people I think we have to be careful about messages when they're watching it and they're thinking it's real, we've got to be really careful, whereas if you've got that critical thinking, that frontal lobe linked in a bit more then you can deal with it so much more easily

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Flipping your lid

    Video transcript - Flipping your lid

    The video clip is two minutes and 24 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Flipping your lid appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    So what comes online in teenage times is the amygdala and the limbic system kind of really feeling everything really intensely, and then this bit (the cortex) comes around and helps to temper those emotions because you start thinking about them and you're a bit more critical, and you temper them with your ability to think. When you think horrible thoughts that stimulates your feelings which triggers off your adrenaline and then when your adrenaline's triggered off you get all these things like you increase breathing, increase heart rate, your immune system's affected because of cortisol going on and on. Your guts get affected: you get diarrhea, feel nausea, you want to throw up, you pee all the time. So all those effects.

    But just so you know what it's like to think with your emotions - all of us I know have lost our keys, already late from work. That's a kind of classic scenario and how many times do we look in the same place? We look in the same place three times, five times, 15 times - totally illogical! You know? If you didn't find it once you're not gonna find it again looking in the same place. So we have flipped our lids. We're thinking with our emotions and our logical thought is gone. So when you're talking to teenagers it's really important to acknowledge that emotion because we all know, you know when we go, "Just calm down. When did you last have them? Think." We can't do that, we just want to slap that person, "Look, just help me find my keys!" That's what teenagers feel. They feel like slapping us because they know that we don't understand, so the most important thing you can do is talk to the emotions. Acknowledge that emotion, show them you're trying to understand (you can't absolutely, but trying to) and then introduce that logical thought and then that makes it so much easier.

    So if somebody's upset by watching a movie just saying to them, "Oh look it's just a movie you know you've got nothing to worry about it's okay." Goes down like a lump of lead but if you can say "Oh yeah how did it make you feel? Did it really make you feel scared?" or, "What did you feel about that, and tell me more about how that's affecting you?" And then introduce "But actually it's only a movie." You know, we all know if we woken up in a nightmare and somebody says, "Oh it's only a dream", you think "But it feels really real! You know, it's taken me I'm really upset." Got to acknowledge that and calm it and soothe it first, and then you talk about it.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Suicide

    Video transcript - Suicide

    The video clip is one minute and sixteen seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Really listen appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    It's not just on 13 Reasons Why, it's also knowing a friend who has suicided, and I think probably the biggest risk factor for somebody to suicide is knowing somebody who has suicided. Whether it be a family member or a friend or just somebody they know in their school. And I think it's really important the parents have that conversation and I think it depends on their stage of development and how young they are and what their experience but I think going from a position of grief and say, "Gosh, wasn't that really sad for that young person, that they had felt that way that they could take their own life?"

    So exploring what your young person thinks about what happens after death is really helpful because you may not realize that they're thinking this stuff and then go, "Have you ever felt like that?" Actually bring it out. "Have you felt like that? And if you have, that's really sad that you feel like that and you've lost that hope that keeps people going. I really need - you need - we need to talk about it if you feel like that. Please if you feel like that and you get thoughts like that, just come and talk; it doesn't matter what time of the day or night, come and tell me because that's much better than carrying it on your own."

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Checking your emotions

    Video transcript - Checking your emotions

    The video clip is 59 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Checking your emotions appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    It's really important for parents to contain your own emotional response before you actually go and talk to your young person, because otherwise the two get conflicted and you don't actually get a good message across. All you get across is your anger, and grief, and horror that this is my child doing this stuff.

    [CLIP FROM RIVERDALE] We're your parents. [EMOTIONAL MUSIC PLAYS]

    Sue: I love the t-shirt says "No you calm down" because you know adults are really good at kind of [exasperate sigh] going off. We all are! We all lose our prefrontal cortex from time to time and so it's important to just calm yourself before you actually bring it up with your young person. But it is good to bring it up because then you can discuss that time and that's a learning time for everybody then.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • How we classify

    Video transcript - How we classify

    This video clip is 2 minutes long. It is an animation. Red cinema curtains pull back, and show a PG label.

    A voice over plays over an animation, which follows a person watching a film between a pink rabbit and a fox. The film makes the person remember crying by a grave, but the rabbit and the fox have a good time. At the end of the animation, the person is watching the film on their phone, tablet, picking out a disc, and at the cinema.

    The transcript for the voice-over follows below:

    Have you ever gone to a film where there was something that made you anxious? Scared? Maybe even dug up some unpleasant memories? We watch films mostly to have a good time, and be informed, but not harmed by its content. Classifications are important so consumers are empowered to choose what is right for them. But who makes these classifications? In New Zealand, it’s us! The Classification Office. Before films come out in New Zealand, one of our classification advisors watches it, and looks out for: sex, horror, crime, cruelty, and violence, as well as offensive language and self-harm content. We give the film a rating based on what we saw, as well as a brief description of the strongest content in the film. It’s not just films. We look at games, books, and all sorts of publications. It can even be a t-shirt.

    We can classify almost anything that needs to be restricted. Everyone has different life experiences and needs. Classifications act as way for people to know what kind of content is in a film. So next time, take a look at the classification. Watch carefully, think critically.

    Visit our website at classificationoffice.govt.nz

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