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Office of Film & Literature Classification

We worked with youth health expert Dame Sue Bagshaw on a quick and easy overview on how our brains grow.

We have tools and advice for parents and whānau to help their rangatahi deal with challenging content.

New law changes will require commercial video on-demand platforms to show New Zealand age ratings and content warnings.

Frequently asked questions and advice for parents who want to talk with their young people about pornography.

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What do the ratings/classifications mean?

What do the ratings/classifications mean?

All about rating/classification labels and descriptive notes.

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Ratings

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OFLC updates

Including updates on the latest research carried out by the Office of Film & Literature Classification, media releases and other breaking news.

Growing up with Porn: Insights from young New Zealanders

18 April 2020

Read our latest research report, Growing up with Porn - Insights from young New Zealanders Read more

How to talk with young people about pornography

18 April 2020

This page contains frequently asked questions and advice for parents who want to talk with their young people about pornography. Read more

NZ Youth and Porn

05 December 2018

Read our research report, NZ Youth and Porn. Read more

Recent classification decisions

These are brief snapshots of recent classification decisions. For more detailed information on selected titles see featured classification decisions

22/04/2021 - R16: Graphic violence and offensive language Read more about Mortal Kombat

What is it? Mortal Kombat is a live action reboot of the iconic video game franchise of the same name. The film focuses on Cole Young – a washed up MMA fighter who has a mysterious dragon insignia branded on his chest. Cole is tracked down by Jax Briggs and Sonja Blade who want to know more about the insignia. Sonja is holding a mercenary named Kano captive who also happens to be branded with the insignia. Fortunately they find Lord Raiden, Liu Kang and Kung Lao before long. Liu Kang and Kung Lao are preparing the Earthrealm for its biggest challenge yet. The Outworld sorcerer Shang Tsung is seeking to enslave the Earthrealm by killing all its fighters before the next tournament. Cole’s heritage may hold the key to defeating Shang Tsung and his merciless warrior Sub-Zero.

What to expect? Mortal Kombat is an entertaining live-action adaptation of the iconic video game franchise. It introduces a new heroic character to the Mortal Kombat universe and captures the origin stories of some of its established stars.

Whilst the games have generally been classified as R18 in New Zealand, older teenagers are likely to be aware of the content and the fantastical context of the film will further mitigate the impact on this audience. The film also lacks the interactivity of the games which tends to amplify the impact and effect. Furthermore, older teenagers will have already been exposed to other films and shows with material similar to that seen in this film.

12/04/2021 - R13: Violence, cruelty and sexual material Read more about Voyagers

What is it? Voyagers is a sci-fi thriller about a group of young astronauts travelling through space to colonise a new world in the wake of devastating climate change. Sela, Christopher, Zac and their crew have lived their lives in confinement to prepare them for spending their lives in a space ship. Only their children and grandchildren will see the new planet. When they discover they have been medicated to keep them placid, they stop taking ‘the blue’, resulting in an explosion of emotions and violence.

What to expect? Voyagers predominantly deals with sex, cruelty and violence. To a lesser degree some lighting and music horror conventions are used to create a sense of psychological tension, and verbal cruelty and bullying add to the hostile tone. Most of the sexual material is fleeting and unlikely to leave much of an impact on children. There is sexual harassment, which within the close confines of the ship is likely to unsettle some younger viewers. As this behaviour is roundly condemned, it is unlikely to negatively shape their attitudes to sex. However moments of cruel violence, particularly a scene where a crew member is senselessly beaten to death, in combination with the tense claustrophobic setting of the ship, are likely to shock and disturb children.

12/04/2021 - R13: Violence, cruelty, offensive language Read more about Ascendant

What's it about? Ascendant is an Australian thriller. It follows a young woman called Arya who wakes up bound and trapped in the high-speed elevator of a high-rise building that is still under construction. The lift is controlled by a man who tortures her by making the elevator go up and down. Video screens in the lift show him simultaneously torturing her father, who works for the CIA. Arya’s special powers are slowly revealed. Flashbacks show that these powers arise from her special connections with nature as a child.

What to expect? The slow-moving feature presents as a horror thriller with a fanciful scenario. It primarily deals with cruelty and violence, as well as some highly offensive language. While inherently cruel, the torture of Arya's father is obscured. Only an impression is created of the grizzly harm and cruelty presumably being inflicted - video interference stops the viewer from seeing any detail. Nonetheless the sustained focus on Arya's distress, and the implication of her increasingly bloodied father’s torture, remains likely to shock and disturb children.

11/02/2021 - R16: Sex scenes and nudity Read more about Ammonite

What is it? Ammonite is a romantic drama film. Set in the 1840s, the film is loosely inspired by the life of Mary Anning, a pioneering self-taught palaeontologist. Mary works alone on the wild and brutal Southern English coastline of Lyme Regis. With the days of her famed discoveries behind her, she now hunts for common fossils to sell to rich tourists. When one such tourist, Roderick Murchison, arrives in Lyme on the first leg of a European tour, he entrusts Mary with the care of his depressed wife, Charlotte. Despite the chasm between their social spheres and personalities, Mary and Charlotte begin a passionate and all-consuming love affair.

What to expect? Ammonite is a bleak and slow-moving film about forbidden love. The film has merit for its period aesthetics and stellar performances by a female-centric cast. The film requires age restriction due to the sex scenes: children and younger teens are likely to find the sex scenes and nudity shocking and confronting. These scenes are intentionally titillating, and society perceives that there is potential for harm in exposing children and young teens to adult sexual behaviour before they are developmentally ready for it.

26/11/2020 - Unrestricted M: Offensive language and suicide references Read more about Mank

What is it? Mank is a biopic detailing the difficult events and history surrounding writing the script for Citizen Kane in 1945. Alcoholic, washed up and with a broken leg, Herman Mankiewicz, a.k.a Mank, is charged by Orson Welles to write a film that is a thinly veiled criticism of the media mogul, William Randoph Hearst – a task that is politically dangerous, given Hearst money and power. Welles organises for Mank to be nursed and supervised to finish the script without alcohol. The film weaves between present and past, as Mank reminisces about his history with Hearst and Hearst’s wife, Marion Davies, in order to construct his masterpiece.

What to expect? Mank is an entertaining, dialogue-driven biopic about writing and redemption. Filmed in black and white, the cinematography and structure of the film heavily references and pays homage to Citizen Kane. The film is likely to be of interest to fans of director, David Fincher, and people interested in cinema history. Despite dealing with suicide and the self-destructive behaviour of its protagonist, any restriction would be unreasonable. The suicide content is of low impact, especially given the historical context and the style of the film. The offensive language in the film is also unlikely to harm, given its infrequency and stylised nature. However, these elements do indicate that the film is targeted at a mature audience.

20/08/2020 - R13: Violence, sexual material and offensive language Read more about Lowdown Dirty Criminals

What is it? Lowdown Dirty Criminals is a New Zealand crime comedy film. It follows two young men in search of a better life. When Freddy loses his job, he and his best buddy Marvin naively conclude a life of crime may lead them to the wealth and standing they desire. But when they mess up their first job while working for the shady Mr Speights, a sequence of hilarious and violent events snowball out of control, and they eventually find themselves the targets of “The Upholsterer” and her henchmen.

What to expect? Lowdown Dirty Criminals is a light hearted comedy film. The film’s unrestricted availability is likely to be injurious to the public good predominantly due to its treatment of sex, crime and violence. The overt sexual material is clearly aimed at an older audience, who are expected to have some knowledge of sex, sexual behaviours and sexual relationships. The main characters cleverly evade law enforcement and the crimes they commit are depicted in a light-hearted manner- giving the film a certain level of moral ambiguity. Younger audiences are unlikely to put these elements into their filmic and generic contexts without being negatively affected. The violence is likely to be normalised by children as a way of retaliating against others, and could affect their ability to empathise with the real life suffering of others.

Minds Over Media

Video transcripts

  • What do they want to know?

    Video transcript - What do they want to know?

    The video clip is a minute long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: What do they want to know? appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    I think it's - again, it's about listening. So it's really important to listen to what actually do they want to know? Because us with our adult minds (dirty, filthy minds that we've got) we go straight to, "Oh, they must be asking about the details of intercourse, or the - they want to know about oral sex, or..." But actually they really don't want that much detail. They just want to know that you're happy to answer. So always - if they ask you a question, you go (gasp) 'Oh, how am I going to answer this?' Just ask them back. "Why do you want to know? What would you like to know about that?" And then clarify, and you might find they don't want to know all that much detail and you go way over the top and totally unnecessarily. So those, "I'm wondering how come you think like that? I'm wondering why you ask that question? I'm just wanting to understand where you're coming from." Rather than listening to think, "Oh help, how am I going to answer that one?"

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Really listen

    Video transcript - Really listen

    The video clip is one minute and two seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Really listen appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    I mean, for me the biggest message I want to get across to parents is "listen". The biggest feedback I get from kids is "My parents don't listen to me". And parents think they're listening, but kids don't feel heard. And I think it's that difference between listening, but you're still doing something and actually listening and reflecting and actually spending time to not necessarily looking people in the eye, because that’s really embarrassing, but while you’re driving or while you’re doing something automatic so that you’re doing it alongside each other, but really hearing. So I think trying to listen to what the underlying message is what the child is trying to say because they haven’t got the vocabulary. So we really need to listen to the emotion and the need underneath. And that kind of listening, whoa. If we could all do that, our society would be way different. Especially our politicians.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Thinking critically

    Video transcript - Thinking critically

    The video clip is 42 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Thinking critically appears on screen.

    I think we kind of need to apply and teach people critical thinking powers to actually see what the underlying assumptions are; actually evaluate them in terms of your own experience and then draw some conclusions about what you're watching, rather than just jumping to conclusions. So I think it's really important that we teach young people right now as they're growing up, even from childhood on, that entertainment is entertainment - it's not reality. Yes we make movies of reality, but at the same time we're doing that for a purpose sometimes to help us reflect and think about ourselves so that we can actually say, "Well are we ok with this?"

    This is intercut with footage from Black Mirror of a young man watching a sexualised music video.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Getting started is easy

    Video transcript - Getting started is easy

    The video clip is 28 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Getting started is easy appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    Watching a movie together is really good, because then you can go, "So what did you think about when that guy kissed her? What do you think about when that guy pushed her over because she wouldn't kiss him? What did you-" and kind of start at that level and kind of have those conversations around something you're watching. It's not the big talk but you pick up on that opportunity of watching something which you know is probably going to touch on those subjects and then you can talk about it.

    This is intercut with footage from 13 Reasons Why of a young woman sliding down a slide and kissing a young man.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • A handy guide to brain development

    Video transcript - A handy guide to brain development

    The video clip is 2 minutes and 15 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: A hnady guide to brain development appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    I'm so glad you asked because now I can do my handy model of brain development! So brains develop from the bottom up. So this bit here is your spinal cord going down the back of your neck. The base of the thumb is the base of your brain and that controls all your organs without you having to think - the automatic nervous system, I call it - and your noradrenaline-adrenaline production; the bit that reacts to fear - that gets you going basically. That's all linked in online when you're born but not much else.

    So all the structures are there but they're not online. The first five years of life you can actually see it through your eyes, because you can see them learn to walk, talk, and chew gum at the same time, and then this bit in the middle - the thumb - is your limbic system. And that's the bit which deals with emotion and new ways of laying down memory. The amygdala's there and the amygdala's really important because that's the bit that looks for danger and it's really on hyper alert with young people and it's firing up like mad, really coming online so their amygdala is much bigger than an adult's. So they're hyper alert already. If they've had bad experiences growing up, that's hyper alerted them as well - their already developed amygdalas.

    But this bit, which is the bit - the cortex - that brings in your thinking about thinking and your ability to think is only online about 20% of the time for teenagers. So they think with their emotions and that's what you have to be aware of when they're exposed to all this media stuff. Adults have that thinking to critically review it and say, "This isn't real, this is rubbish; this doesn't equate with anything I know" but teenagers haven't got that. So adults need to be the frontal cortex for their teenagers, to be able to help them calm down their amygdalas, which go zooming off with horror stuff. We all like a bit of a noradrenaline buzz, that's why horror movies do so well, but at the same time not overly much.

    Because some young people will have that horror buzz for two years after they've seen something and that's going to affect how they function in their lives. So really important that parents are there to help filter and to help do that critical thinking.

    This is intercut with footage from Black Mirror of a child being taken care of by her caregivers, and seeing other students in a playground watching media.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Concrete vs abstract thinkers

    Video transcript - Concrete vs abstract thinkers

    The video clip is one minute and seven seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Concrete vs. Abstract Thinkers appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    The other thing that I think we have to remember is the nature of a concrete thinker. So a concrete thinker will take everything literally and will just translate what they've seen into real life, whereas an abstract thinker will go, "Oh yeah, but that's not real life - that's fine, I can keep my stuff separate. That's just entertainment, that's okay." But it's a really blurred line for a lot of things, especially if you've had adverse experiences growing up, so you blur that line. It's really hard to know what's real and what's not and that's I think the danger of the violence that we see and the sexual violence that we see is: where's that blurred line, and how do we determine where that line comes when it's so difficult to determine what's real and what's not real? And certainly for young people I think we have to be careful about messages when they're watching it and they're thinking it's real, we've got to be really careful, whereas if you've got that critical thinking, that frontal lobe linked in a bit more then you can deal with it so much more easily

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Flipping your lid

    Video transcript - Flipping your lid

    The video clip is two minutes and 24 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Flipping your lid appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    So what comes online in teenage times is the amygdala and the limbic system kind of really feeling everything really intensely, and then this bit (the cortex) comes around and helps to temper those emotions because you start thinking about them and you're a bit more critical, and you temper them with your ability to think. When you think horrible thoughts that stimulates your feelings which triggers off your adrenaline and then when your adrenaline's triggered off you get all these things like you increase breathing, increase heart rate, your immune system's affected because of cortisol going on and on. Your guts get affected: you get diarrhea, feel nausea, you want to throw up, you pee all the time. So all those effects.

    But just so you know what it's like to think with your emotions - all of us I know have lost our keys, already late from work. That's a kind of classic scenario and how many times do we look in the same place? We look in the same place three times, five times, 15 times - totally illogical! You know? If you didn't find it once you're not gonna find it again looking in the same place. So we have flipped our lids. We're thinking with our emotions and our logical thought is gone. So when you're talking to teenagers it's really important to acknowledge that emotion because we all know, you know when we go, "Just calm down. When did you last have them? Think." We can't do that, we just want to slap that person, "Look, just help me find my keys!" That's what teenagers feel. They feel like slapping us because they know that we don't understand, so the most important thing you can do is talk to the emotions. Acknowledge that emotion, show them you're trying to understand (you can't absolutely, but trying to) and then introduce that logical thought and then that makes it so much easier.

    So if somebody's upset by watching a movie just saying to them, "Oh look it's just a movie you know you've got nothing to worry about it's okay." Goes down like a lump of lead but if you can say "Oh yeah how did it make you feel? Did it really make you feel scared?" or, "What did you feel about that, and tell me more about how that's affecting you?" And then introduce "But actually it's only a movie." You know, we all know if we woken up in a nightmare and somebody says, "Oh it's only a dream", you think "But it feels really real! You know, it's taken me I'm really upset." Got to acknowledge that and calm it and soothe it first, and then you talk about it.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Suicide

    Video transcript - Suicide

    The video clip is one minute and sixteen seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Really listen appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    It's not just on 13 Reasons Why, it's also knowing a friend who has suicided, and I think probably the biggest risk factor for somebody to suicide is knowing somebody who has suicided. Whether it be a family member or a friend or just somebody they know in their school. And I think it's really important the parents have that conversation and I think it depends on their stage of development and how young they are and what their experience but I think going from a position of grief and say, "Gosh, wasn't that really sad for that young person, that they had felt that way that they could take their own life?"

    So exploring what your young person thinks about what happens after death is really helpful because you may not realize that they're thinking this stuff and then go, "Have you ever felt like that?" Actually bring it out. "Have you felt like that? And if you have, that's really sad that you feel like that and you've lost that hope that keeps people going. I really need - you need - we need to talk about it if you feel like that. Please if you feel like that and you get thoughts like that, just come and talk; it doesn't matter what time of the day or night, come and tell me because that's much better than carrying it on your own."

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • Checking your emotions

    Video transcript - Checking your emotions

    The video clip is 59 seconds long. White background. A small pause button appears on screen before turning into the Minds Over Media logo, which reads "Minds Over Media. Watch carefully. Think critically." Dr Sue Bagshaw's name appears on screen alongside that of the Collaborative Trust. The title of the video, Talking to young people: Checking your emotions appears on screen.

    Sue's voiceover plays over this. Transcript follows below:

    It's really important for parents to contain your own emotional response before you actually go and talk to your young person, because otherwise the two get conflicted and you don't actually get a good message across. All you get across is your anger, and grief, and horror that this is my child doing this stuff.

    [CLIP FROM RIVERDALE] We're your parents. [EMOTIONAL MUSIC PLAYS]

    Sue: I love the t-shirt says "No you calm down" because you know adults are really good at kind of [exasperate sigh] going off. We all are! We all lose our prefrontal cortex from time to time and so it's important to just calm yourself before you actually bring it up with your young person. But it is good to bring it up because then you can discuss that time and that's a learning time for everybody then.

    White background. Image of Classification Office logo with Massey University logo. Text on screen reads: Office of Film and Literature Classification Te Tari Whakarōpū Tukuata, Tuhituhinga. www.classificationoffice.govt.nz; and Massey University Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa University of New Zealand, College of Humanities and Social Sciences. End of clip.

    With thanks to Drs. Sue Bagshaw of the Collaborative Trust and Claire Henry of Massey University. Ka pai!

  • How we classify

    Video transcript - How we classify

    This video clip is 2 minutes long. It is an animation. Red cinema curtains pull back, and show a PG label.

    A voice over plays over an animation, which follows a person watching a film between a pink rabbit and a fox. The film makes the person remember crying by a grave, but the rabbit and the fox have a good time. At the end of the animation, the person is watching the film on their phone, tablet, picking out a disc, and at the cinema.

    The transcript for the voice-over follows below:

    Have you ever gone to a film where there was something that made you anxious? Scared? Maybe even dug up some unpleasant memories? We watch films mostly to have a good time, and be informed, but not harmed by its content. Classifications are important so consumers are empowered to choose what is right for them. But who makes these classifications? In New Zealand, it’s us! The Classification Office. Before films come out in New Zealand, one of our classification advisors watches it, and looks out for: sex, horror, crime, cruelty, and violence, as well as offensive language and self-harm content. We give the film a rating based on what we saw, as well as a brief description of the strongest content in the film. It’s not just films. We look at games, books, and all sorts of publications. It can even be a t-shirt.

    We can classify almost anything that needs to be restricted. Everyone has different life experiences and needs. Classifications act as way for people to know what kind of content is in a film. So next time, take a look at the classification. Watch carefully, think critically.

    Visit our website at classificationoffice.govt.nz

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